finnmarksvidda samipath atv utv turer sapmi safari elg bjørn aktiviteter things to do
SAMIPATH is the leading supplier of quality activities in Sapmi
With us, you can embrace the wonderful landscape around Karasjok, learn about the Sami culture and the way of life of the northern Norwegian people.
2
SAMIPATH is the leading supplier of quality activities in Sapmi
With us, you can embrace the wonderful landscape around Karasjok, learn about the Sami culture and the way of life of the northern Norwegian people.
1
SAMIPATH is the leading supplier of quality activities in Sapmi
With us, you can embrace the wonderful landscape around Karasjok, learn about the Sami culture and the way of life of the northern Norwegian people.

The eight Sami seasons

In our Sami culture we have eight seasons, these can be said to be closely linked to the reindeer
natural migration and the tasks of the reindeer owners throughout the year, but there are also others
things that can be linked to these seasons. The Sami seasonal cycle has its own
name – jahkodat. These can be divided into:

Čakcadálvi (autumn winter)

November December
In November-December, the reindeer owners collect the animals for slaughter, marking and moving to winter pasture. The animals now graze on marshes, in thickets and in dense forest where it is still abundant with herbs, lichen and last remnants of mushrooms.

Dálvi (winter)

December - February
From December to February, the animals are on winter pasture on the plain. The reindeer have to dig grazing holes to get down to the lichen under the snow, but otherwise saves it as much energy as possible.

Giđđadálvi (spring winter)

February March
In February and March, the animals are still on winter pasture. In this period, counting takes place and the herd is prepared for the migration to summer pasture.

Giđđa (spring)

April - May
The reindeer are moved from winter grazing down towards the calving areas / the coast. In April-May begins the snow to melt, and the reindeer must graze on bare spots and rock lichens that stick up from the snow because ice makes it difficult to dig down to lichen.

Giđđageassi (spring summer)

May - June
This is a very important and fragile time for reindeer husbandry. This is The season is when nature is at its most vulnerable. In May-June, the smolts move down to theirs permanent calving areas, where they give birth to a calf each.

Geassi (summer)

June - August
I juni-august er reinen på sommerbeite i lavlandet og langs kysten.  Her spiser de godt, og kalvene vokser fort for å bli store nok for å overleve vinteren.

Čakca (autumn)

October - November
In October-November, the reindeer migrate to the good autumn pasture, where the reindeer also have mating season. Other Sami activities that are relevant in the time period: People start cleaning away the summer equipment and prepare for winter and the quiet time of darkness.

Čakcageassi (Autumn Summer)

August - September
In August-September, it is time to earmark the new calves. The reindeer owners hang number plates on the calves, and use binoculars to see which simle they are following. The reindeer moves a lot between good grazing areas and fattens up on herbs, plants and preferably mushrooms.

How will you experience Finnmarksvidda?

Challenge yourself on an expedition in Finnmark's untouched wilderness, or enjoy yourself in the small metropolis of Karasjok,
with a rich offer of culture, food and shopping. These three travel concepts make it easier for you to find the Finnmarsk experience that suits you best!

northern lights

safari

river paddling

hunt

river boat

Snow kiting

Welcome to NORD

Karasjok, capital of the Sami - Kárášjohka, municipality in Finnmark county, Sápmi, Norway

The municipality is Norway's second largest municipality. Karasjok comprises the eastern part of the Finnmarksvidda and borders Finland in the east. The national border here follows the river Anárjohka, which is named Deatnu (Tana River) after its confluence with the Kárášjohka. Borders with Kautokeino, Tana, Porsanger, Alta and Utsjok on the Finnish side.

About 80 percent of the population is Sami, while in addition to Norwegian there is also some Finnish settlement here. The Sami are an indigenous people who have their traditional settlement areas in Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. The land area that the Sami people traditionally inhabit used to be called Lapland, but is now called Sápmi. The main industry in the municipality is tourism, reindeer husbandry and a strong public sector.

Inspiration from our many trips

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